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What determines the type of train?

  • 17 maart 2015
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Hello everybody!

I have a question, what determines if the intercity train is the one with 2 floors or the one with just one floor?
Does it depend of the route?

For example, trips from Rotterdam to Utrecht are always done by the one floor train.

thank you!
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Beste antwoord door Stephan NS 18 maart 2015, 09:20

Dear kbenjelloun,

Welcome to our NS Service Forum. There are always logistic reasons for us to use a particular type of train on a particular track; this is often all planned far in advance. The type of train assigned to the track depends on e.g. the amount of travellers, length of platforms on the stations where the train stops, etc etc. The website Keuzereiziger provides you is very useful indeed; just type in your station of departure, if you are interested in the type of train that rides on your track.

Kind regards,
Stephan
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Hello everybody!

I have a question, what determines if the intercity train is the one with 2 floors or the one with just one floor?
Does it depend of the route?

For example, trips from Rotterdam to Utrecht are always done by the one floor train.

thank you!


Hi Kbenjelloun,

Short answer: yes, there are types of trains assigned to routes. On the Rotterdam-Utrecht intercity train, you will hardy see anything else besides the one floor train and double floor train you mention.

Longer answer:
The type of train is unfortunately not fixed, not even for the Utrecht-Rotterdam route. In general, the planning of each day is the same. So if you take the train om mondays 15:47u at Utrecht Central station, it is planned to be the same train (even same rolling stock piece) as last week monday 15:47u. However, due to the complex problem of planning rolling stock in case of disruptions, it might be the case that the train is of a different type. Even NS does not know beforehand which type of train will run tomorrow.

A nice website you might find usefull is http://vertrektijden.rijdendetreinen.nl/ (unfortunately only in Dutch). But the idea is simple: type in a stations name and you'll see the trains departing in the coming hour(s), including a picture of the train type and length.
Dear kbenjelloun,

Welcome to our NS Service Forum. There are always logistic reasons for us to use a particular type of train on a particular track; this is often all planned far in advance. The type of train assigned to the track depends on e.g. the amount of travellers, length of platforms on the stations where the train stops, etc etc. The website Keuzereiziger provides you is very useful indeed; just type in your station of departure, if you are interested in the type of train that rides on your track.

Kind regards,
Stephan
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...

Thank you for your answers!

Actually I was wondering something. I always do the route Enschede - Gouda. I started last november doing this everyday. There are two train combinations per hour and it was always the "one floor" intercity. But then, one or two months ago, it changed completely and now it is always one "one floor" intercity per hour, and one "two floors" intercity per hour. If this was due to logistic reasons, the reason why the "two floor" intercity is the one that is being used now should be that there are a lot of passengers, but actually this train goes always empty, or almost empty. So I was wondering why.

Also, I was curious why it changed.

Thank you all again for your answers!

met vriendelijk and reiziger groetjes,
Karim
I think the long answer would be that stretches with more passengers get the double-deckers, while more quiet stretches get the single-decker trains. However, longer train routes may be served with double-deckers even though parts of the route are not that crowdy, such as the Alkmaar - Maastricht Intercity service, which really needs double-deckers between Alkmaar and Eindhoven, while further on the route, double-deckers aren't really that needed. Still, they can hardly take off the top floor in Eindhoven, so the entire route is always served by double-deckers. ;)
The Schiphol - Heerlen service however, is not always served by double-decker, even though it runs partly over the same route (Utrecht - Eindhoven). Schiphol - Utrecht however has a higher frequency than Alkmaar - Utrecht, so it might have something to do with connections elsewhere on the route.

An overview of departing trains in English can be viewed at http://www.everythinginenglish.nl/tools/stationtimes.php?station=[insert station name here] but the website linked above is, IMHO, more interesting since it also shows a picture of the train used. Everythinginenglish.nl doesn't do that (yet?).

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